Plenary Session 01: HIV Vaccine Strategies

Tuesday, 8 October | 08:30 – 10:00

Nicole Bernard

PL01.01 | 08:30 – 09:00
Manufacturing HIV Envelope Proteins for HIV Vaccines: An NIAID Perspective of Where We Are and What is Still Needed

Nicole Bernard
McGill University, Canada 

Biography

Nicole Bernard did her Ph.D. in Microbiology and Immunology at Duke University and postdoctoral fellowships as the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill and the University of Toronto. She is currently an Associate Professor at McGill University where she directs a research program at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre. Her research interests are in understanding the host responses that underlie the persistent seronegativity of certain individuals despite high level HIV exposure and the slow disease progression observed in a subset of HIV infected persons. She has played a founding role in establishing the Canadian Cohort of HIV Infected Slow Progressors.  Her current interests involve studying innate responses and the interaction of these with the adaptive arm on the immune response that lead to protective immunity to HIV.

 

 
Andrew McMichael

PL01.02 | 09:00 – 09:30
Vaccine Induction of T cell Immunity to HIV-1

Andrew McMichael
University of Oxford, United Kingdom

Biography

Andrew McMichael qualified in Medicine from Cambridge and did his PhD on B cell memory at NIMR Mill Hill, London. He then spent 2 years at Stanford and returned to Oxford in 1977. He has worked on human T cell responses to virus infections initially on influenza and then on HIV-1. Alain Townsend and he were first to show CD8 T cells recognize virus derived peptides presented by MHC molecules. He and Rodney Philllips first to described HIV-1 escape from T cells and with Nilu Goonetilleke and the CHAVI team he showed how it influences acute HIV-1 infection. WIth Mark Davis he introduced tetramer technology to human immunology. He has been interested in HIV vaccines for fifteen years and has developed a conserved region vaccine which is now in Phase I trials.

 

 
Barton Hanyes

PL01.03 | 09:30 – 10:00
Pathways of Affinity Maturation of HIV-1 Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies

Barton Hanyes
Duke Human Vaccine Institute, USA

Biography

Barton Haynes is Director of the Human Vaccine Institute at Duke University.  He currently is the leader of the Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immunology (CHAVI-ID) funded by the NIH, and a Collaboration for AIDS Vaccine Discovery Center funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.